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The Lampedusa Disaster: How to Prevent Further Loss of Life at Sea?
1 Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
ABSTRACT: Lampedusa - an Italian island barely 70 miles from northern Africa and 100 miles from Malta - has become a gateway to Europe for migrants. In some seasons, boats filled with asylum seekers arrive almost daily. However, yearly, hundreds of people die trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea. This paper will deal with the obligations of States towards seaborne migrants, the question of why so many people die near Lampedusa and the possible solutions in order to prevent further loss of life at sea.
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Citation note:
Coppens J.: The Lampedusa Disaster: How to Prevent Further Loss of Life at Sea?. TransNav, the International Journal on Marine Navigation and Safety of Sea Transportation, Vol. 7, No. 4, doi:10.12716/1001.07.04.15, pp. 589-598, 2013

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